Holiday Book List (1)

December 4, 2020

These are the non-fiction books on my most recent ever-evolving wish/gift list. It’s an eclectic selection for sure. Perhaps a sign of the times that comfort food and wine features along with personal profiles in kindness and community. Add a little cozy decor, book chat and trivia for good measure and it’s looking like a great reading and gifting season. (Click on bold titles to be taken to IndieBound for more information) The list of novels deserves a post of its own so standby for that in short order.

Half Baked Harvest Super Simple (Tieghan Gerard) – Had me at simple! Started off writing that I’m a Half-Baked fan but realized that would require more clarity. I’ve made quite a few Half Baked Harvest recipes discovered in the realm of Pinterest and have loved them all. I always appreciate when ingredients and skills are easily accessible.

Ina Garten’s Modern Comfort Food (Ina Garten) – The Barefoot Contessa gets it right every time. Nothing too complicated here either. Lovely photos and clear directions and delicious outcomes no matter who’s in the kitchen. Ideal for easy inspiration as we spend less time out and more time in these days.

Wine Folly: The Master Guide (Magnum Edition) (Madeline Puckette and Justin Hammack) – Now this is a beautiful edition of a classic wine guide. Wine expert Madeline Puckette is not only an engaging purveyor of wine knowledge but she’s apparently also a graphic designer which enables her to present all sorts of interesting tidbits in a beautiful and clear way. There are charts and maps and little drawings, all frame worthy. In fact, many of the pages can indeed be ordered as posters. This would be appreciated equally in the library of a wine connoisseur or a wine newbie. A fantastic gift book.

Extraordinary Canadians: Stories from the Heart of our Nation (Peter Mansbridge and Mark Bulgutch) – Canadian icon Peter Mansbridge knows Canada and her people through and through. While he may have connections to the headliners, the extraordinary Canadians he’s chosen to feature are a little more under the radar. The publisher Simon & Schuster describes the book this way: “a collection of first-person stories about remarkable Canadians who embody the values of our great nation—kindness, compassion, courage, and freedom—and inspire us to do the same.” Even more reasons to be grateful to be Canadian.

Humans (Brandon Stanton) – I’ve written here before about the storyteller Brandon Stanton. I still loyally follow his series and look forward to this collection of stories gathered beyond the realm of New York. The same heartwarming (or wrenching) tales of love and goodwill but from all around the globe. The photos alone are stunning.

The 99% Invisible City – A Field Guide to the Hidden World of Everyday Design (Roman Mars and Kurt Kohlstedt) On occasion a Podcast becomes so popular it begets a book. 99% Invisible is one such example. Thought much about trash can design? Drinking fountains? Fire Escapes? Crosswalks? The backstories to urban design features and architecture for both the curious and oblivious. One reviewer (Mary Roach) writes: “Your city’s secret anatomy laid bare—a hundred things you look at but don’t see, see but don’t know. Each entry is a compact, surprising story, a thought piece, an invitation to marvel.” The information is conversational and tucked in amid striking line drawings. I love this stuff! Your Covid walks through town will never be boring again. Read this and be the star conversationalist at your next (Zoom) gathering!

The Writer’s Library: The Author’s You Love on the Books That Changed Their Lives (Nancy Pearl and Jeff Schwager) – I’m always curious to know about the books that are treasured most on people’s bookshelves. It seems to me that successful writers would have the highest of standards and this collection of book titles must be pretty special and interesting. 23 contemporary authors (think Donna Tartt, Amor Towles, Laurie Frankel, Richard Ford …) “reveal the books that made them think, brought them joy, and changed their lives in this intimate, moving, and insightful collection” Sounds like you can cuddle up with this one and have your pen and paper handy for recommendations.

Natural Elegance: Luxurious Mountain Living (Rush Jenkins, Klaus Baer, William Abranowicz) – You know I can’t pass up a trip through the Design and Decor section. This incredibly attractive book takes us into a cozy wonderland of “refined rustic” interiors by award-winning WRJ Design of Jackson Hole. We get to play looky-loo into a number of their extraordinary home projects and come away with a lovely dose of inspiration. The views through the (many and large) windows are as breathtaking as the interiors. Armchair traveling at its best and a great gift for your own interior design geek.

My Ideal Bookshelf

January 17, 2013

Ideal Bookshelf 498 - Christmas

I love the artwork of Jane Mount and have shared it here previously. (Visit this blog entry to refresh your memory.) Now Ms. Mount has taken her beautiful bookshelf brushwork to a new venue: a book!

My Ideal Bookshelf by Jane Mount and Thessaly LaForce

This coffee table book offers the visual delight of Jane’s paintings of the personal shelves of 100 writers, musicians, designers and other “creatives” along with their equally colourful notes and thoughts collected by Thessaly La Force.

“The paintings are accompanied by first-person commentary drawn from interviews with editor Thessaly La Force, which touch on everything from the choice of books to becoming a writer to surprising sources of inspiration. This exquisite collection provides rare insight into the creative process and artistic development of today’s most intriguing writers, innovators, and visionaries.”

This is a wonderful collection –  interesting and beautiful while also satisfying a particular curiosity we have about the books one chooses to read, and their influence on our personal journeys.

Enjoy!

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